» General Checklists, Keys & Guides Related to the West Coast of Florida : 

Checklists, Keys & Guides Related to the West Coast of Florida

Algae
Dawes, Clinton J. and Jack F. Van Breedveld.  (1969).  Benthic marine algaeMemoirs of the Hourglass cruises, v. 1, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory, Dept. of Natural Resources. 
(157 species of marine algae (38 Chlorophyta, 29 Phaeophyta, 85 Rhodophyta, 5 Cyanophyta) have been identified from the Hourglass cruises of the Marine Research Laboratory, Florida Board of Conservation.  The monthly collections were made on the continental shelf in the Gulf of Mexico between the entrance to Tampa Bay and Fort Myers at depths of 6 to 73 meters over a period of 28 months and included a variety of oceanographic data which have served as a basis for certain ecological observations, especially temperature relationships.  18 of the species appear to be new records for Florida.)

Schneider, Craig W. and Richard B. Searles.  (1991).  Seaweeds of the southeastern United States.  Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press.

Woelkerling, W. J., B.  Foy, and J. MacKenzie.  (1976).  South Florida benthic marine algae: keys and comments.  Miami, Fla.: Comparative Sedimentology Laboratory, Division of Marine Geology and Geophysics, University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science.
Annelids (Polychaetes, Oligochaetes)
Camp, David K., William G. Lyons and Thomas H. Perkins.  (1998).  Checklists of selected shallow-water marine invertebrates of Florida.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Florida Marine Research Institute. 
OR
(The publication provides a checklist of all species of mollusks, polychaetous annelids, malacostracan crustaceans, and echinoderms known to occur in Florida's estuarine and coastal marine waters offshore to depths of approximately 37 meters.  Compilation of the version ended in November 1997.) 

Gosner, Kenneth L.  (1971).  Guide to identification of marine and estuarine invertebrates: Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy.  New York: Wiley-Interscience.

Milligan, M. R. and M. Hulbert.  (1995).  Identification manual for the aquatic Oligochaeta of Florida, Vol. II:  Estuarine and nearshore marine oligochaetes.  Tallahassee, Fla.: State of Florida, Dept. of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Facilities.
ftp://ftp.dep.state.fl.us/pub/labs/biology/biokeys/oligoest.pdf      

Perkins, Thomas Harold and Thomas Savage.  (1975).  A bibliography and checklist of polychaetous annelids of Florida, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean region.  St.  Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.

Uebelacker, Joan M. and Paul G. Johnson (Eds.).  (1984).  Taxonomic guide to the polychaetes of the northern Gulf of Mexico.  Metairie, La.: United States Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region.
Chelicerates  (sea spiders)

Child, C. Allan.  (1992).  Shallow-water Pycnogonida of the Gulf of Mexico.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 9, pt. 1.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Marine Research Institute.

Crustaceans (Amphipods, Brachiopods , copepods, crabs, isopods, lobsters, mysids, shrimps, stomatopods)
Abele, Lawrence G. and Won Kim.  (1986).  Illustrated guide to the marine decapod crustaceans of Florida.  Vol I & II.  Tallahassee, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Environmental Regulation.
Camp, David K.  (1973).  Stomatopod crustacea.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 3, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Library, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources. 
(Thirteen species of stomatopod crustaceans were captured in a 28 month sampling program at ten stations along two transects on the central west Florida shelf.  Variations in morphology and meristics of most species are presented.  Additional information on predators, food items and feeding habits, commensal relationships, habitats, geographic and bathymetric distributions, faunal associations and diel cycles was also obtained for selected species.)

Camp, David K., William G. Lyons and Thomas H. Perkins.  (1998).  Checklists of selected shallow-water marine invertebrates of Florida.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Florida Marine Research Institute. 
OR
(The publication provides a checklist of all species of mollusks, polychaetous annelids, malacostracan crustaceans, and echinoderms known to occur in Florida's estuarine and coastal marine waters offshore to depths of approximately 37 meters.  Compilation of the version ended in November 1997.) 

Cooper, G. Arthur.  (1973).  Brachiopods (recent).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 3, pt. 3.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources.

Culter, J. K.  (1986).  Manual for identification of marine invertebrates: a guide to some common estuarine macroinvertebrates of the Big Bend Region, Tampa Bay, Florida.  Cincinnati, Ohio: Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Dardeau, M. R.  (1984).  Synalpheus shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Alpheidae).  I, The Gambarelloides group, with a description of a new species.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 7 pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Bureau of Marine Research.

Dardeau, M. R. and Richard W. Heard.  (1983).  Crangonid shrimps (Crustacea, Caridea), with a description of a new species of Pontocaris.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 6, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources.

Farrell, Douglas H.  (1979).  Guide to shallow-water mysids from Florida.   Tampa, Fla.: Florida Department of Environmental Regulation.
ftp://ftp.dep.state.fl.us/pub/labs/biology/biokeys/mysids.pdf       

Huff, James Alan,  and S. P. Cobb.  (1979).  Penaeoid and Sergestoid shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 5 , pt. 4.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources.

Gore, Robert H.  (1979).  Crabs of the family Parthenopidae (Crustacea Brachyura: Oxyrhyncha): with notes on specimens from the Indian River region of FloridaMemoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 3, pt. 6.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources.

Gosner, Kenneth L.  (1971).  Guide to identification of marine and estuarine invertebrates; Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy.  New York: Wiley-Interscience.

Grice, George Daniel.  (1978).  Copepods of the Florida West Coast.  Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Florida State University, Tallahassee.

LeCroy, Sara E. and Johnny S. Richardson.  (2000).  Illustrated identification guide to the nearshore marine and estuarine gammaridean Amphipoda of Florida.  Tallahassee, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Division of Resource Assessment and Management, Bureau of Laboratories.
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/labs/library/keys.htm     

LeCroy, Sara Ellen.  (1995).  Amphipod Crustacea III, family Colomastigidae.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 9, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Institute, Dept. of Environmental Protection. 

Lowry, James K. and Helen E. Stoddart.  (1995).  Amphipoda Crustacea IV: families aristiidae, cyphocarididae, endevouridae, lysianassidae, scopelocheiridae, uristidae.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 8, pt. 1.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Marine Research Institute, Department of Environmental Protection.

Lyons, William G.  (1970).  Scyllarid lobsters (Crustacea, Decapoda).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 1, pt. 4.  St.  Petersburg, Marine Research Laboratory, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources.

Markham, John C.  (1985).  Review of the bopyrid isopods infesting caridean shrimps in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, with special reference to those collected during the Hourglass Cruises in the Gulf of Mexico.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 7 pt. 3.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Bureau of Marine Research.

Menzies, Robert J. and William L. Kruczynski.  (1983).  Isopod crustacea (exclusive of Epicaridea).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 6, pt. 1.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.

Myers, Alan A.  (1981).  Amphipod crustacea: I. family aoridae.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 5, pt. 5.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.

Ortiz, Manuel.  (1991).  Amphipod crustacea: II. family bateida.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 8, pt. 1.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Marine Research Institute.

Stock, Jan H.  (1979).  Serpulidicolidae, a new family of Copepoda associated with tubicolous polychaetes, with descriptions of a new genus and species from the Gulf of MexicoMemoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 5, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Marine Research Institute.

Thomas, J. D.  (1993).  Identification manual for the marine Amphipoda: (Gammaridea), I. Common coral reef and rocky bottom amphipods of south Florida.  Tallahassee, Fla.: Dept. of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Management, Bureau of Surface Water Management.
ftp://ftp.dep.state.fl.us/pub/labs/biology/biokeys/sflampds.pdf
(The author covers 52 species of amphipods with distributional notes and ecological information.)
Echinoderms (Sea stars, basket stars, serpent stars,sand dollars, urchins, sea cucumbers, crinoids.)

Camp, David K., William G. Lyons and Thomas H.  Perkins.  (1998).  Checklists of selected shallow-water marine invertebrates of Florida.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Florida Marine Research Institute. 

OR
(The publication provides a checklist of all species of mollusks, polychaetous annelids, malacostracan crustaceans, and echinoderms known to occur in Florida's estuarine and coastal marine waters offshore to depths of approximately 37 meters.  Compilation of the version ended in November 1997.) 

Culter, J. K.  (1986).  Manual for identification of marine invertebrates: a guide to some common estuarine macroinvertebrates of the Big Bend Region, Tampa Bay, Florida.  Cincinnati, Ohio: Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency.

Gosner, Kenneth L.  (1971).  Guide to identification of marine and estuarine invertebrates; Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy.  New York: Wiley-Interscience.

Hendler, Gordon.  (1995).  Sea stars, sea urchins, and allies: Echinoderms of Florida and the Caribbean.  Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Miller, John E. and David L. Pawson.  (1984).  Holothurians (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 7, pt. 1.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources Marine Research Laboratory.

Serafy, D. Keith.  (1979).  Echinoids (Echinodermata, Echinoidea).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 5, pt. 3.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.

 

Fishes
Briggs, John Cameron.  (1958).  List of Florida fishes and their distribution.  Bulletin of the Florida State Museum, 2(8): 223-318.
OR
Bullock, Lewis H. and Gregory B. Smith.  (1991).  Seabasses: (Pisces:Serranidae).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 8, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Marine Research Institute. 

Carr, A. F.  (1936).  Key to the freshwater fishes of Florida.  Proceedings of the Florida Academy of Sciences, (1936) 1: 72-86.

Darovec, John E.  (1995).  Checklist and local-distribution analyses of fishes from the Hourglass cruises.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 4, pt. 1.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Marine Research Institute, Dept. of Environmental Protection.

Darovec, John E.  (1983).  Sciaenid fishes (Osteichthyes, Perciformes) of western peninsular FloridaMemoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 6, pt. 3.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.

Hoese, H.  Dickson and Richard H.  Moore.  (1998).  Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, and adjacent waters.  College Station, Tex.: Texas A&M University Press.

Ross, Stephen T.  (1983).  Searobins (Pisces: Triglidae).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 6, pt. 4.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.

Smith, C. Lavett.  (1997).  National Audubon Society field guide to tropical marine fishes of the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, Florida, the Bahamas, and Bermuda.  New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Stevenson, Henry M.  (1976).  Vertebrates of Florida: Identification and distribution.  Gainesville, Fla.:  University Presses of Florida. 
OR
Topp, Robert W. and Frank H. Hoff, Jr.  (1972).  Flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes).  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 4, pt. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory.
(Eighteen flatfish species were collected by trawl and box dredge during Project Hourglass, a 28 month systematic sampling program off southwestern Florida.  Information on each species is included, as available, including descriptive data, geographical distribution, environmental correlatives, seasonality, diurnality, food and feeding, reproduction, size, abundance and commercial importance.)

United States Fish and Wildlife Service.  (1978).  Development of fishes of the Mid-Atlantic Bight: an atlas of egg, larval, and juvenile stages.  Fort Collins, Colo.: The Service.
Mollusks (Bivalves, snails)
Andrews, Jean.  (1994).  Field guide to shells of the Florida coast.  Houston, Tex.: Gulf Pub. Co.

Camp, David K., William G. Lyons and Thomas H. Perkins.  (1998).  Checklists of selected shallow-water marine invertebrates of Florida.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Florida Marine Research Institute. 
OR
(The publication provides a checklist of all species of mollusks, polychaetous annelids, malacostracan crustaceans, and echinoderms known to occur in Florida's estuarine and coastal marine waters offshore to depths of approximately 37 meters.  Compilation of the version ended in November 1997.) 

Culter, J. K.  (1986).  Manual for identification of marine invertebrates: a guide to some common estuarine macroinvertebrates of the Big Bend Region, Tampa Bay, Florida.  Cincinnati, Ohio: Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency.

Gosner, Kenneth L.  (1971).  Guide to identification of marine and estuarine invertebrates; Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy.  New York: Wiley-Interscience.

Perry, Louise M. and Jeanne S. Schwengel.  (1955).  Marine shells of the western coast of Florida.  Ithaca, N.Y.: Paleontological Research Institution. 

Vilas, Curtis N. and Naomi R. Vilas.  (1952).  Florida marine shells: A guide for collectors of shells of the southeastern Atlantic coast and Gulf coast.  2nd ed.  Rutland, Vt.: C. E. Tuttle Co.
Plankton (Phytoplankton, zooplankton)

Faust, Maria A. and Rose A. Gulledge.  (2002).  Identifying harmful marine Dinoflagellates.  Washington, DC: Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural History.

Horner, Rita A.  (2002).  Taxonomic guide to some common marine phytoplankton.  Bristol, England: Biopress.

Marshall, Harold G.  (1987).  Identification manual for phytoplankton of the United States Atlantic CoastCincinnati, Ohio: Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency.

Newell, G. E.  and R. C. Newell.  (1977).  Marine plankton, a practical guide.  London, England: Hutchinson Educational.

Saunders, Richard P. and Donald A. Glenn.  (1969).  Diatoms.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises, v. 1, pt. 3.  St.  Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory, Dept. of Natural Resources.
(Identifications, enumerations, and surface area estimates were made from 216 unpreserved water samples collected from August 1965 through July 1966.  Surface, middle, and bottom levels were sampled monthly at six stations located in the Gulf of Mexico between St.  Petersburg and Ft.  Myers, Florida.  The abundance levels, cellular surface areas, and species composition of diatom populations at these stations were examined from the standpoints of seasonality, sampling depths, and salinity; 186 taxa were recorded.)

Smith, DeBoyd L. and Kevin B. Johnson.  (1996).  Guide to marine coastal plankton and marine invertebrate larvae.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co.

Steidinger, Karen A. and Jean Williams.  (1970).  Dinoflagellates.  Memoirs of the Hourglass cruises; v. 2.  St. Petersburg, Fla.: Marine Research Laboratory. 
(During the Hourglass Cruises (a systematic sampling program in the eastern Gulf of Mexico), 232 dinoflagellate taxa were recorded from 504 live and 41 tow samples.  These collections were taken over a 28 month period from six stations located on transects between St.  Petersburg and Ft.  Myers, Florida.  Trends of seasonal and horizontal distribution are presented, and observed salinities, temperatures and counts are provided for individual taxa.)

Tomas, Carmelo R. and G. R. Hasle.  (1997).  Identifying marine phytoplankton.  San Diego: Academic Press.

Tomas, Carmelo R. and Jahn Throndsen.  (1993).  Marine phytoplankton: a guide to naked flagellates and coccolithophorids.  San Diego: Academic Press.

United States Fish and Wildlife Service.  (1978).  Development of fishes of the Mid-Atlantic Bight: an atlas of egg, larval, and juvenile stages.  Fort Collins, Colo.: The Service.

Wilson, Charles Branch.  (1932).  Copepods of the Woods Hole region, Massachusetts.  Smithsonian Institution.  United States National Museum.  Bulletin; 158.  Lochem, Netherlands, Reprinted by: Antiquariaat Junk, Dr.  R.  Schierenberg & Sons N.V.

 

Plants

Nellis, David W.  (1994).  Seashore plants of South Florida and the Caribbean: a guide to identification and propagation of xeriscape plants.  Sarasota, Fla.: Pineapple Press.

Ward, Daniel B.  (1968).  Checklist of the vascular flora of Florida, part 1.  Gainesville, Fla.: Agricultural Experiment Stations, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.

Vertebrates (Mammals, reptiles, birds)
Brown, Larry N.  (1987).  Checklist of Florida's mammals.  Tallahassee, Fla.: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Nongame Wildlife Program.
Stevenson, Henry M.  (1976).  Vertebrates of Florida: Identification and distribution.  Gainesville, Fla.:  University Presses of Florida. 
OR