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Faculty Scholarship

Journal Acceptance Rates

It can be very difficult to get an article published in a scholarly journal.  For information on acceptance rates of journal articles of business, accounting,economics,  education and psychology journals, please see Cabell's Scholarly Analytics database (linked above.)

Some journals post their acceptance rates on their websites.  

Other useful sites include: 

Cabell's Predatory Report - Avoid These Journals

Beware of "Predatory Journals"

Predatory journals or vanity presses typically charge hefty publication fees and advertise a quick turn around time.  The peer-review and editing  process may be low quality and the website may disappear without warning.  You may want to proceed with caution if the journal you are publishing with has several of the following characteristics.  It may still be a good journal, but you may want to look at the submission site carefully, review past issues, contact the editorial board, and talk with other scholars who have published in that journal. 

  • Pricey author fees
  • Dishonest about geographic location, i.e., publisher claims to be located in New York City but a closer look shows another place entirely
  • Hasty turn-around time
  • Poor website design
  • Editorial board and other relevant contact information is missing from the website.  No past issues are posted.
  • One-man operation
  • Mass emails
  • Suspicious domain registration
  • Mega journal model

Quality Control Tools:

Recent articles on the topic: 

Nature.com: "Predatory journals: no definition, no defence"
The Journal of Academic Librarianship "How is open access accused of being predatory? The impact of Beall's lists of predatory journals on academic publishing"